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Sydney EATS – Here’s Where

April 21, 2015

Sydney - Come For The Art, Stay For The Food.

Bec Ryba, our New York based creative director, returned to Sydney for two weeks and with fresh eyes tracked down six of the best new eating spots.

By Rachel Ang

Acme

Ensconced on Bayswater Road in the heart of Rushcutters Bay, Acme is understated ‘cool’ behind cornflower blue window frames, and a neon sign above the door. The menu is short, dominated by simple, quality ingredients; Italian fare infused with Chinese flavours and accents. The moniker is derived from the initials of the four owners, Andy Emerson, Cam Fairbairn, Mitch Orr and Ed Loveday, but also refers to the Greek word, meaning the zenith, peak, or best of something. High Tea this Saturday, April 19 will feature cocktails from resident mixologist, Ed Loveday, and sandwiches by head chef Mitchell Orr. There are surprises galore behind the blue door.

Acme, image via Melting Butter

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Acme, image via Melting Butter

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Pinbone

Pinbone opened its doors in 2013, and is run by three young Sydney talents previously known for pop-up events: Mike Eggert, Jemma Whiteman and front of house, Berri Eggert. The light, airy space is a perfect foil for their creative takes on old-school Aussie favourites: chocolate crackles now include a chicken liver parfait as ‘icing’, and fairy bread has been given a savoury interpretation – slices of brioche spread with creamy mascarpone, three varieties of caviar and chives, presenting a surprising textural delight. With most restaurants branding themselves ‘modern Australian’ these days, the label has lost the cachet it once had. Pinbone’s playful reinterpretations of Australian fare might better be called ‘post-modern Australian.’

Pinbone

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Pinbone

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Pinbone

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The Butler

Nestled in the back streets of Potts Point, The Butler surely boasts some of the best views of any Sydney eatery. With its long leather banquettes, cane chairs, botanical print wallpaper and restrained colour palette, the atmosphere and fare is French colonial bistro. The menu, with classics such as steak frites, featuring a colossal 450-gram beef rib eye with parsley butter and tapenade, also encompasses more current offerings, for instance, salted-cod croquettes and crispy pork belly. Add some high-end cocktails to the mix and you’ve got a leisurely, seriously sophisticated, possibly boozy lunch.

The Butler

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The Butler

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Chester White Diner

The setting is a charming, old-school diner, all glossy tiles, red vinyl seating and forties-style frosted glass shades behind a white picketed, Potts Point cottage facade. Fortunately, the fare is not at all old-fashioned. With a short menu and a choice of only two beers, Chester White has chosen quality over quantity. Based around cured meats, fish and pickles, the menu is fresh and seasonal. This is food made for sharing – once you choose your meat (salumi, speck or culatello), choose from sides of kale chips, jacket potatoes, cheeses and pickles.

Photo by Josh Eriksson

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Photo by Josh Eriksson

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Photo by Josh Eriksson

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Photo by Josh Eriksson

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The Powder Keg

The Powder Keg brings a modern interpretation of Ye Olde Gin Palace to Potts Point. They take their gin seriously – Powder Keg boasts one of the largest boutique gin collections in South East Asia. But it’s not all about the drink. Or, it is, but it’s also about the food: elevated pub food, plus some intriguing concoctions – negroni ice cream sandwich, duck schnitzel lollipops and oysters with gin and tonic sorbet. This year, The Powder Keg will start hosting “Gin Masterclasses” and “Twisted High Teas”, so check their website for updates.

The Powder Keg

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The Powder Keg

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Tim Ho Wan

If you’ve ever dined at the hole-in-the-wall establishment which is Tim Ho Wan in Hong Kong, you’ll be pleased to hear they are have expanded to a Sydney site in Chatswood Mall’s new food court. Where else can you eat Michelin starred dim sum for less than $20? The fit out is much the same as their incarnations in Asia – fun, cheerful and family friendly – the ideal setting for a big yum cha outing with the folks. Thankfully, the menu also remains the same as across the ditch. Hongkongers favour four dishes, dubbed the ‘Heavenly Kings’: the baked dumplings, a steamed egg cake, vermicelli roll filled with pork liver and the pan-fried carrot cake (actually a tasty savoury slab of radish – dip it in the chilli sauce as Chinese diners do). Word to the wise: just like in Hong Kong, the queues are long. Get in early or be prepared to wait.

Tim How Wan

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Tim How Wan, Photo by Stellar Concepts

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Sydney Eats

Acme
60 Bayswater Road, Rushcutters Bay NSW 2011, Australia, +61 2 8068 0932

Pinbone
3 Jersey Rd, Woollahra NSW 2025.

The Butler
123 Victoria Street, Potts Point NSW 2011, Australia

The Powder Keg
7 Kellett Street, Potts Point NSW 2011, Australia

Chester White Diner
3 Orwell Street, Potts Point NSW 2011, Australia, +61 2 9332 3692

Tim Ho Wan
Corner of Victoria Ave & Railway Street, Chatswood, New South Wales, Australia, +61 2 9898 9888

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